FAQ’s

 

 

Other companies charge up to $80.  The “other guys” are not properly certified or licensed as instructors to teach in Oregon per ORS 166.291(1)(f)(c).  This is fair warning.

You are eligible to receive your Oregon Concealed Handgun License if:

  • You are a citizen of the United States
    or
  • You are a legal resident alien who can document continuous residency in the county for at least six months and has declared in writing to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services the intent to acquire citizenship status and can present proof of the written declaration to the sheriff at the time of application for the license
    AND…
  • You are at least 21 years of age
  • You are a resident of the County in which you apply for the Concealed Handgun License
  • You have no outstanding warrants for arrest
  • You are not free on any form of pretrial release
  • Has never been convicted of a felony or found guilty, except for insanity under ORS 161.295, of a felony
  • Have not been convicted of a misdemeanor or found guilty, except for insanity under ORS 161.295, of a misdemeanor within the four years prior to the application
  • Have not been committed to the Oregon Health Authority under ORS 426.130
  • Have not been found to be mentally ill and is not subject to an order under ORS 426.130 that the person be prohibited from purchasing or possessing a firearm as a result of that mental illness
  • Have been discharged from the jurisdiction of the juvenile court for more than four years if, while a minor, the person was found to be within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court for having committed an act that, if committed by an adult, would constitute a felony or a misdemeanor involving violence, as defined in ORS 166.470
  • Have not been convicted of an offense involving controlled substances or participated in a court-supervised drug diversion program
  • Is not subject to a citation issued under ORS 163.735 or an order issued under ORS 30.866, 107.700 to 107.735 or 163.738
  • Have not received a dishonorable discharge from the Armed Forces of the United States
  • Is not required to register as a sex offender in any state.
  • See our Oregon Revised Statutes (hyperlink these three words) page if your record has been “expunged”

AND you demonstrate competence with a handgun by any one of the following:

  • Completed a hunter education or hunter safety course approved by the State Department of Fish and Wildlife or a similar agency of another state if handgun safety was a component of the course
  • Completion of any National Rifle Association firearms safety or training course if handgun safety was a component of the course
  • Completion of any firearms safety or training course or class offered by law enforcement, community college, or private or public institution or organization or firearms training school utilizing instructors certified by the National Rifle Association or a law enforcement agency if handgun safety was a component of the course
  • Completion of any law enforcement firearms safety or training course or class offered for security guards, investigators, reserve law enforcement officers or any other law enforcement officers if handgun safety was a component of the course
  • Presents evidence of equivalent experience with a handgun through participation in organized shooting competition or military service
  • Is licensed or has been licensed to carry a firearm in this state, unless the license has been revoked
    OR…
  • Completion of any firearms training or safety course or class conducted by a firearms instructor certified by a law enforcement agency or the National Rifle Association if handgun safety was a component of the course!NOTE: Handgun Safety as a component of the course is a common thread in all these classes. If you’ve taken these classes but either don’t have documentation proving that you have done so, or the classes did not contain “HANDGUN SAFETY” as a component of the class, you can obtain that here at Onlinegunschool.com by watching the training video and then taking the short quiz.

Our instructors are both Nationally-Certified Firearms Instructors and Certified Law Enforcement Firearms Instructors. You rest easy knowing that our instructors meet and exceed the requirements listed in the Oregon Revised Statutes 166.291 (1)(f)(c). Plus, we offer you a 100% money back guarantee.  If there is ever a problem with any type of acceptance of your certificate, please let us know and we will handle it for you and take care of any problems you might have or your money back!  What are you waiting for?  It’s FREE to take the course!

The application costs are listed in the table below.New Application $65.00

  • Renewal License $50.00
  • Transfer Fee $30.00
  • Name Change $15.00
  • Address Change, Replacement $15.00
  • Fees are non-refundable. Only checks, money order, and Visa/MasterCard are accepted.
You may apply for a concealed handgun license in your County by meeting one of the residency requirements as stated in ORS 166.291(9):

Possess a current Oregon driver’s license showing a residence in the County in which you apply.

Be registered to vote in that County and have a precinct memorandum card showing a residence address in that County.

Provide documentation that you currently own or lease real property in the County where you wish to apply.

Provide documentation that you filed an Oregon tax return for the most recent tax year with a residence address in that county.

Applications can be obtained online “AND” at “THE COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE WHERE YOU RESIDE”.  Access their website directly or give them a call. You can also go into the office and obtain an application directly.

That depends on the county in which you apply. Resources may be found on the website for that particular county.
If you are a New Applicant or a Transfer from another county, you may need to schedule an appointment at the County Sheriff in your area. You should call to confirm that.
You must be at least 21 years of age prior to making application for a concealed handgun license.
You may be any age to attend a class and receive your certification.
No! The certification is what a person needs as a prerequisite to take down to the sheriff’s office and make their application for the license.
Throughout the state, instructors put countless hours into teaching, training, and certifying Oregonians for their CHL. That class or course comes with a price. You should know that the class is separate and apart from the licensure at the sheriff’s office.
Yes. The only exception is if you are a legal resident alien who can document continuous residency in the county for at least six months and has declared in writing to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services the intent to acquire citizenship status and can present proof of the written declaration to the sheriff at the time of application for the license.
Proof of competency must be presented at the time of your scheduled appointment (if an appointment is required) or when you bring your application into the sheriff’s office.

Presenting a hunter education or hunter safety card;

If you took a National Rifle Association firearms safety or training course if handgun safety was a component of the course and you have your certificate;

If you have a certificate of completion for a firearms safety course from a school that has NRA instructors or police officers that teach the classes. You always have to have the handgun safety element in the class.  If it deals with rifles, it won’t suffice;

f you got certified in this state or any other state for armed security or as a police officer and you can show proof that a portion of the training involved handgun safety.  This might be your training affidavit from the instructor (In Oregon, that would be your PS-6 form)

Experience with a handgun through participation in organized shooting competition or military service;

Showing your old concealed handgun from Oregon

Doing an NRA or law enforcement handgun class and presenting that certificate when you go in to the county sheriff’s office.

Maybe. If your DD214 specifically states the words pistol, sidearm or handgun training, it would satisfy the requirement. Words such as “small arms” or “marksmanship” alone will not fulfill the statutory requirement.
It is valid for four years.
A concealed handgun license allows you to carry it with either a round in the chamber or no round in the chamber and hidden in some fashion like under a seat, in your coat, in your pocket, in a backpack, etc.
No. This is a concealed handgun license. See ORS 166.210(4) for the definition of a handgun.
Yes. There are several locations in which you cannot carry a firearm, even with a concealed handgun license, including:

Any federal facility — federal courthouses, social security offices, BLM offices, secured areas of airports, airplanes.

Posted private property where the owner prohibits firearms possession, and others.

Many private businesses have conditions regarding the possession of firearms on their premises. If you violate these conditions you could, under certain circumstances, be subject to arrest under Oregon trespass laws, in which case, if convicted, your concealed handgun licensee would be seized and/or revoked.

National forests marked or posted with signs prohibiting all firearms.

Indian reservations or property — you may not carry a firearm concealed without the written permission of the tribal judge; this may also apply to certain casinos on tribal lands.

Courts or court buildings — in a courtroom, jury room, judge’s chambers, or adjacent areas that the presiding judge determines should be free of firearms to ensure the safety of litigants, court personnel witnesses, and others (This does NOT include municipal courts or municipal court buildings).

PLEASE NOTE: If you plan to carry your handgun, it is important to research the requirements at these locations before you go. Please see the Oregon Revised Statutes for any updated Oregon State restrictions. Please consult a licensed attorney before making any decisions. You may also contact the facility you plan to visit directly to obtain their policy.
You need to check with the Port Authority of each airport as other airports in Oregon are under other jurisdictions.

Go to the county sheriff and get that changed.  It will cost you $15. You can do it online.  The replacement CHL will be mailed to you.
The concealed handgun license is an Oregon license, but it is administered in the county you reside in. When you change your DMV license you need to transfer your concealed handgun license so that both addresses are the same. Your County will fingerprint you as a result of the transfer application process.  The fee for a transfer is $15 plus you’ll have to get new fingerprints.  The total transfer fee including fingerprinting is $30.
If you will be transferring your license to another county, register with that county. They will notify us that you are no longer a concealed handgun license holder in that County. However, if you do not transfer your license to another Oregon county or if you move out of state, you must notify the your County Sheriff’s Office where your license originated.
You should report the loss of your concealed handgun license to the law-enforcement agency in the city or county in which you lost your license. You can apply for a replacement. Once the application is completed, if you pass the background check, a new license will be mailed to you.  The fee for a replacement license is $15.
You should first report your name-change to the DMV. After you notify DMV of your name change, we can issue a card with your new name.  Your driver’s license must display your new name prior to obtaining a new concealed handgun license. You can apply online for a name change. Once the application is completed online, if you pass the background check, a new license will be mailed to you.  The fee for a name change is $15.
Currently, some but not all County Sheriff’s Offices send email reminders from the provided email listed on your application 45 days prior to your license’s expiration. This expiration date is listed on the back of your License.
You are not required to be fingerprinted or to provide character references again. Pursuant to ORS 166.295(1)(a), a concealed handgun license is renewable by repeating the procedures set out in ORS 166.291 and 166.292. Once the application is completed, if you pass the background check, a new license will be mailed to you.
No. Your valid or expired concealed handgun license is proof that you attended a handgun safety course.  There are no penalties for letting your license expire. However, without a valid concealed handgun license, you have no authority to carry a handgun concealed. Some counties will provide you authority to carry during the time that you are awaiting your renewed CHL to arrive in the mail. check with your local County Sheriff office for that information. However, if you let your license lapse, you may not carry until you receive your replacement license in the mail.
Not necessarily. It is the policy of the some County Sheriff offices not to issue concealed handgun licenses to anyone who is not a resident of that County. Other Oregon counties may have different policies, especially those which border other states. Check with them. Border state counties have authority to approve or deny your request based on the evidence and reasoning that you provide to them regarding your travels and business in adjoining counties in other states. It is not a guarantee.
This is a serious offense and can result in arrest and seizure and revocation of your license.
ORS 166.292(2) states: “Failure of a person who carries a concealed handgun also to carry a concealed handgun license is prima facie evidence that the person does not have such a license.”
Yes. We are mandated by law to fingerprint new applicants for concealed handgun licenses, regardless of whether they have been fingerprinted before.
In most counties, it generally takes about 10 minutes to apply for your renewal application. Assuming there is nothing in your background to preclude you from renewing your license; once your background check is completed, a new license will be mailed to you.
It generally takes about 20 minutes to process new applications. ORS 166.292 allows the Sheriff 45 days to review your new application, conduct a background check and issue you your new concealed handgun license.

Different sheriff’s offices have different turn-around times for the licensure. It is safe to assume if there are issues that arise as a result of your background check; it will take 45 days for your new license to be issued or denied. Currently, please expect waiting times of anywhere from 4-8 weeks for your license to be processed due to the extreme workload currently in existence.

If your concealed handgun license is denied or revoked, you will be sent a certified letter advising you of that fact and the reason for the denial/revocation.
Generally, anything that would cause you to be denied a license when you initially applied would cause your concealed handgun license to be revoked. Examples would include: new arrests where you are on a form of pre-trial release, any misdemeanor or felony conviction, being named as the respondent of a restraining order that’s in effect.
Please contact the office of the County Sheriff where you applied for your license if you have a concern in this area.
Yes. Oregon law provides an appeal process for denials and revocations through the filing of a petition through Circuit Court. You have 30 days from the date you receive the revocation letter to appeal the decision. For additional information refer to ORS 166.293(5).
Yes. Under Oregon law, OMMP use is medicinal and not illegal.  The only issues are if you have a criminal record for such use, you may be denied.

No, your certificate is good for life as long as you have a copy of it.  Children as young as 5 years old have come through our live courses and received certificates.  Their parents will keep their certificates for them until they are old enough to apply for their own license.  You may keep it for as long as you like until you decide to apply for your CHL and then simply provide a copy to the County Sheriff’s office in the county in which you reside.

Oregon Revised Statutes – ORS 166.291 Through 166.295 And Other Oregon Concealed Handgun Laws

Applying For your CHL

            166.291. (1) The sheriff of a county, upon a person’s application for an Oregon concealed handgun license, upon receipt of the appropriate fees and after compliance with the procedures set out in this section, shall issue the person a concealed handgun license if the person:

      (a)(A) Is a citizen of the United States; or

      (B) Is a legal resident alien who can document continuous residency in the county for at least six months and has declared in writing to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services the intent to acquire citizenship status and can present proof of the written declaration to the sheriff at the time of application for the license;

      (b) Is at least 21 years of age;

      (c) Is a resident of the county;

      (d) Has no outstanding warrants for arrest;

      (e) Is not free on any form of pretrial release;

      (f) Demonstrates competence with a handgun by any one of the following:

      (A) Completion of any hunter education or hunter safety course approved by the State Department of Fish and Wildlife or a similar agency of another state if handgun safety was a component of the course;

      (B) Completion of any National Rifle Association firearms safety or training course if handgun safety was a component of the course;

      (C) Completion of any firearms safety or training course or class available to the general public offered by law enforcement, community college, or private or public institution or organization or firearms training school utilizing instructors certified by the National Rifle Association or a law enforcement agency if handgun safety was a component of the course;

      (D) Completion of any law enforcement firearms safety or training course or class offered for security guards, investigators, reserve law enforcement officers or any other law enforcement officers if handgun safety was a component of the course;

      (E) Presents evidence of equivalent experience with a handgun through participation in organized shooting competition or military service;

      (F) Is licensed or has been licensed to carry a firearm in this state, unless the license has been revoked; or

      (G) Completion of any firearms training or safety course or class conducted by a firearms instructor certified by a law enforcement agency or the National Rifle Association if handgun safety was a component of the course;

      (g) Has never been convicted of a felony or found guilty, except for insanity under ORS 161.295, of a felony;

      (h) Has not been convicted of a misdemeanor or found guilty, except for insanity under ORS 161.295, of a misdemeanor within the four years prior to the application;

      (i) Has not been committed to the Oregon Health Authority under ORS 426.130;

      (j) Has not been found to be mentally ill and is not subject to an order under ORS 426.130 that the person be prohibited from purchasing or possessing a firearm as a result of that mental illness;

      (k) Has been discharged from the jurisdiction of the juvenile court for more than four years if, while a minor, the person was found to be within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court for having committed an act that, if committed by an adult, would constitute a felony or a misdemeanor involving violence, as defined in ORS 166.470;

      (L) Has not been convicted of an offense involving controlled substances or participated in a court-supervised drug diversion program, except this disability does not operate to exclude a person if:

      (A) The person has been convicted only once of violating ORS 475.864 (3) and has not completed a court-supervised drug diversion program under ORS 135.907; or

      (B) The person has completed a court-supervised drug diversion program under ORS 135.907 and has not been convicted of violating ORS 475.864 (3);

      (m) Is not subject to a citation issued under ORS 163.735 or an order issued under ORS 30.866, 107.700 to 107.735 or 163.738;

      (n) Has not received a dishonorable discharge from the Armed Forces of the United States; and

      (o) Is not required to register as a sex offender in any state.

      (2) A person who has been granted relief under ORS 166.274 or 166.293 or 18 U.S.C. 925(c) or has had the person’s record expunged under the laws of this state or equivalent laws of other jurisdictions is not subject to the disabilities in subsection (1)(g) to (L) of this section.

      (3) Before the sheriff may issue a license:

      (a) The application must state the applicant’s legal name, current address and telephone number, date and place of birth, hair and eye color and height and weight. The application must also list the applicant’s residence address or addresses for the previous three years. The application must contain a statement by the applicant that the applicant meets the requirements of subsection (1) of this section. The application may include the Social Security number of the applicant if the applicant voluntarily provides this number. The application must be signed by the applicant.

      (b) The applicant must submit to fingerprinting and photographing by the sheriff. The sheriff shall fingerprint and photograph the applicant and shall conduct any investigation necessary to corroborate the requirements listed under subsection (1) of this section. If a nationwide criminal records check is necessary, the sheriff shall request the Department of State Police to conduct the check, including fingerprint identification, through the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The Federal Bureau of Investigation shall return the fingerprint cards used to conduct the criminal records check and may not keep any record of the fingerprints. The Department of State Police shall report the results of the fingerprint-based criminal records check to the sheriff. The Department of State Police shall also furnish the sheriff with any information about the applicant that the Department of State Police may have in its possession including, but not limited to, manual or computerized criminal offender information.

      (4) Application forms for concealed handgun licenses shall be supplied by the sheriff upon request. The forms shall be uniform throughout this state in substantially the following form:

      (5)(a) Fees for concealed handgun licenses are:

      (A) $15 to the Department of State Police for conducting the fingerprint check of the applicant.

      (B) $50 to the sheriff for the issuance or renewal of a concealed handgun license.

      (C) $15 to the sheriff for the duplication of a license because of loss or change of address.

      (b) The sheriff may enter into an agreement with the Department of Transportation to produce the concealed handgun license.

      (6) No civil or criminal liability shall attach to the sheriff or any authorized representative engaged in the receipt and review of, or an investigation connected with, any application for, or in the issuance, denial or revocation of, any license under ORS 166.291 to 166.295 as a result of the lawful performance of duties under those sections.

      (7) Immediately upon acceptance of an application for a concealed handgun license, the sheriff shall enter the applicant’s name into the Law Enforcement Data System indicating that the person is an applicant for a concealed handgun license or is a license holder.

      (8) The county sheriff may waive the residency requirement in subsection (1)(c) of this section for a resident of a contiguous state who has a compelling business interest or other legitimate demonstrated need.

      (9) For purposes of subsection (1)(c) of this section, a person is a resident of a county if the person:

      (a) Has a current Oregon driver license issued to the person showing a residence address in the county;

      (b) Is registered to vote in the county and has a memorandum card issued to the person under ORS 247.181 showing a residence address in the county;

      (c) Has documentation showing that the person currently leases or owns real property in the county; or

      (d) Has documentation showing that the person filed an Oregon tax return for the most recent tax year showing a residence address in the county.

      166.292 Procedure for issuing; form of license; duration. (1) If the application for the license is approved, the sheriff shall issue and mail or otherwise deliver to the applicant at the address shown on the application, within 45 days of the application, a wallet sized license bearing the photograph of the licensee. The license must be signed by the licensee and carried whenever the licensee carries a concealed handgun.

      (2) Failure of a person who carries a concealed handgun also to carry a concealed handgun license is prima facie evidence that the person does not have such a license.

      (4) An Oregon concealed handgun license issued under ORS 166.291 and this section, unless revoked under ORS 166.293, is valid for a period of four years from the date on which it is issued.

      (5) The sheriff shall keep a record of each license issued under ORS 166.291 and this section, or renewed pursuant to ORS 166.295.

      (6) When a sheriff issues a concealed handgun license under this section, the sheriff shall provide the licensee with a list of those places where carrying concealed handguns is prohibited or restricted by state or federal law. [1989 c.839 §9 (166.291 to 166.293 enacted in lieu of 166.290); 1993 c.625 §5; 1993 c.693 §2; 1993 c.735 §5]

      166.293 Denial or revocation of license; review. (1) If the application for the concealed handgun license is denied, the sheriff shall set forth in writing the reasons for the denial. The denial shall be sent to the applicant by certified mail, restricted delivery, within 45 days after the application was made. If no decision is issued within 45 days, the person may seek review under the procedures in subsection (5) of this section.

      (2) Notwithstanding ORS 166.291 (1), and subject to review as provided in subsection (5) of this section, a sheriff may deny a concealed handgun license if the sheriff has reasonable grounds to believe that the applicant has been or is reasonably likely to be a danger to self or others, or to the community at large, as a result of the applicant’s mental or psychological state or as demonstrated by the applicant’s past pattern of behavior involving unlawful violence or threats of unlawful violence.

      (3)(a) Any act or condition that would prevent the issuance of a concealed handgun license is cause for revoking a concealed handgun license.

      (b) A sheriff may revoke a concealed handgun license by serving upon the licensee a notice of revocation. The notice must contain the grounds for the revocation and must be served either personally or by certified mail, restricted delivery. The notice and return of service shall be included in the file of the licensee. The revocation is effective upon the licensee’s receipt of the notice.

      (4) Any peace officer or corrections officer may seize a concealed handgun license and return it to the issuing sheriff if the license is held by a person who has been arrested or cited for a crime that can or would otherwise disqualify the person from being issued a concealed handgun license. The issuing sheriff shall hold the license for 30 days. If the person is not charged with a crime within the 30 days, the sheriff shall return the license unless the sheriff revokes the license as provided in subsection (3) of this section.

      (5) A person denied a concealed handgun license or whose license is revoked or not renewed under ORS 166.291 to 166.295 may petition the circuit court in the petitioner’s county of residence to review the denial, nonrenewal or revocation. The petition must be filed within 30 days after the receipt of the notice of denial or revocation.

      (6) The judgment affirming or overturning the sheriff’s decision shall be based on whether the petitioner meets the criteria that are used for issuance of a concealed handgun license and, if the petitioner was denied a concealed handgun license, whether the sheriff has reasonable grounds for denial under subsection (2) of this section. Whenever the petitioner has been previously sentenced for a crime under ORS 161.610 or for a crime of violence for which the person could have received a sentence of more than 10 years, the court shall grant relief only if the court finds that relief should be granted in the interest of justice.

      (7) Notwithstanding the provisions of ORS 9.320, a corporation, the state or any city, county, district or other political subdivision or public corporation in this state, without appearance by attorney, may appear as a party to an action under this section.

      (8) Petitions filed under this section shall be heard and disposed of within 15 judicial days of filing or as soon as practicable thereafter.

      (9) Filing fees for actions shall be as for any civil action filed in the court. If the petitioner prevails, the amount of the filing fee shall be paid by the respondent to the petitioner and may be incorporated into the court order.

      (10) Initial appeals of petitions shall be heard de novo.

      (11) Any party to a judgment under this section may appeal to the Court of Appeals in the same manner as for any other civil action.

      (12) If the governmental entity files an appeal under this section and does not prevail, it shall be ordered to pay the attorney fees for the prevailing party. [1989 c.839 §9a (166.291 to 166.293 enacted in lieu of 166.290); 1993 c.735 §6; 1995 c.518 §3; 1995 c.658 §89; 1999 c.1052 §7; 2003 c.14 §65; 2007 c.202 §1; 2007 c.368 §3]

      166.295 Renewal of license. (1)(a) A concealed handgun license is renewable by repeating the procedures set out in ORS 166.291 and 166.292, except for the requirement to submit fingerprints and provide character references. A licensee may submit the application for renewal by mail if the licensee:

      (A) Is an active member of the Armed Forces of the United States, the National Guard of the United States or the Oregon National Guard; and

      (B) Submits with the application proof of the licensee’s military orders and a copy of the licensee’s military identification.

      (b) An otherwise expired concealed handgun license continues to be valid for up to 45 days after the licensee applies for renewal if:

      (A) The licensee applies for renewal before the original license expires;

      (B) The licensee has proof of the application for renewal; and

      (C) The application for renewal has not been denied.

      (2) If a licensee changes residence, the licensee shall report the change of address and the sheriff shall issue a new license as a duplication for a change of address. The license shall expire upon the same date as would the original. [1989 c.839 §10; 1993 c.735 §7; 2007 c.368 §4]

      166.297 Annual report regarding revocation of licenses. (1) The sheriff of a county shall submit annually to the Department of State Police a report containing the number of concealed handgun licenses revoked during the reporting period and the reasons for the revocations.

      (2) The Department of State Police shall compile the reports submitted under subsection (1) of this section and shall submit the compilation to the Legislative Assembly biennially. [1993 c.735 §13]

      166.300 Killing or injuring another with firearm as cause for loss of right to bear arms. (1) Any person who has committed, with firearms of any kind or description, murder in any degree, or manslaughter, either voluntary or involuntary, or who in a careless or reckless manner, kills or injures another with firearms, and who, at any time after committing murder or manslaughter or after said careless or reckless killing or injury of another, carries or bears firearms of any kind or description within this state, commits a Class A misdemeanor.

      (2) Subsection (1) of this section does not deprive the people of this state of the right to bear arms for the defense of themselves and the state, and does not apply to any peace officer in the discharge of official duties or to a member of any regularly constituted military organization while on duty with such military organization. [Amended by 2011 c.597 §163]

USE OF PHYSICAL FORCE

      161.190 Justification as a defense. In any prosecution for an offense, justification, as defined in ORS 161.195 to 161.275, is a defense. [1971 c.743 §18]

      161.195 “Justification” described. (1) Unless inconsistent with other provisions of chapter 743, Oregon Laws 1971, defining justifiable use of physical force, or with some other provision of law, conduct which would otherwise constitute an offense is justifiable and not criminal when it is required or authorized by law or by a judicial decree or is performed by a public servant in the reasonable exercise of official powers, duties or functions.

      (2) As used in subsection (1) of this section, “laws and judicial decrees” include but are not limited to:

      (a) Laws defining duties and functions of public servants;

      (b) Laws defining duties of private citizens to assist public servants in the performance of certain of their functions;

      (c) Laws governing the execution of legal process;

      (d) Laws governing the military services and conduct of war; and

      (e) Judgments and orders of courts. [1971 c.743 §19]

      Note: See second note under 161.015.

      161.200 Choice of evils. (1) Unless inconsistent with other provisions of chapter 743, Oregon Laws 1971, defining justifiable use of physical force, or with some other provision of law, conduct which would otherwise constitute an offense is justifiable and not criminal when:

      (a) That conduct is necessary as an emergency measure to avoid an imminent public or private injury; and

      (b) The threatened injury is of such gravity that, according to ordinary standards of intelligence and morality, the desirability and urgency of avoiding the injury clearly outweigh the desirability of avoiding the injury sought to be prevented by the statute defining the offense in issue.

      (2) The necessity and justifiability of conduct under subsection (1) of this section shall not rest upon considerations pertaining only to the morality and advisability of the statute, either in its general application or with respect to its application to a particular class of cases arising thereunder. [1971 c.743 §20]

      Note: See second note under 161.015.

      161.205 Use of physical force generally. The use of physical force upon another person that would otherwise constitute an offense is justifiable and not criminal under any of the following circumstances:

      (1)(a) A parent, guardian or other person entrusted with the care and supervision of a minor or an incompetent person may use reasonable physical force upon such minor or incompetent person when and to the extent the person reasonably believes it necessary to maintain discipline or to promote the welfare of the minor or incompetent person.

      (b) Personnel of a public education program, as that term is defined in section 1, chapter 665, Oregon Laws 2011, may use reasonable physical force upon a student when and to the extent the application of force is consistent with section 3, chapter 665, Oregon Laws 2011.

      (2) An authorized official of a jail, prison or correctional facility may use physical force when and to the extent that the official reasonably believes it necessary to maintain order and discipline or as is authorized by law.

      (3) A person responsible for the maintenance of order in a common carrier of passengers, or a person acting under the direction of the person, may use physical force when and to the extent that the person reasonably believes it necessary to maintain order, but the person may use deadly physical force only when the person reasonably believes it necessary to prevent death or serious physical injury.

      (4) A person acting under a reasonable belief that another person is about to commit suicide or to inflict serious physical self-injury may use physical force upon that person to the extent that the person reasonably believes it necessary to thwart the result.

      (5) A person may use physical force upon another person in self-defense or in defending a third person, in defending property, in making an arrest or in preventing an escape, as hereafter prescribed in chapter 743, Oregon Laws 1971. [1971 c.743 §21; 1981 c.246 §1; 2011 c.665 §10]

      Note 1: The amendments to 161.205 by section 10, chapter 665, Oregon Laws 2011, become operative July 1, 2012. See section 12, chapter 665, Oregon Laws 2011. The text that is operative until July 1, 2012, is set forth for the user’s convenience.

      161.205. The use of physical force upon another person that would otherwise constitute an offense is justifiable and not criminal under any of the following circumstances:

      (1) A parent, guardian or other person entrusted with the care and supervision of a minor or an incompetent person may use reasonable physical force upon such minor or incompetent person when and to the extent the person reasonably believes it necessary to maintain discipline or to promote the welfare of the minor or incompetent person. A teacher may use reasonable physical force upon a student when and to the extent the teacher reasonably believes it necessary to maintain order in the school or classroom or at a school activity or event, whether or not it is held on school property.

      (2) An authorized official of a jail, prison or correctional facility may use physical force when and to the extent that the official reasonably believes it necessary to maintain order and discipline or as is authorized by law.

      (3) A person responsible for the maintenance of order in a common carrier of passengers, or a person acting under the direction of the person, may use physical force when and to the extent that the person reasonably believes it necessary to maintain order, but the person may use deadly physical force only when the person reasonably believes it necessary to prevent death or serious physical injury.

      (4) A person acting under a reasonable belief that another person is about to commit suicide or to inflict serious physical self-injury may use physical force upon that person to the extent that the person reasonably believes it necessary to thwart the result.

      (5) A person may use physical force upon another person in self-defense or in defending a third person, in defending property, in making an arrest or in preventing an escape, as hereafter prescribed in chapter 743, Oregon Laws 1971.

      Note 2: The amendments to 161.205 by section 11, chapter 665, Oregon Laws 2011, become operative June 30, 2017. See section 12, chapter 665, Oregon Laws 2011. The text that is operative on and after June 30, 2017, is set forth for the user’s convenience.

      161.205. The use of physical force upon another person that would otherwise constitute an offense is justifiable and not criminal under any of the following circumstances:

      (1) A parent, guardian or other person entrusted with the care and supervision of a minor or an incompetent person may use reasonable physical force upon such minor or incompetent person when and to the extent the person reasonably believes it necessary to maintain discipline or to promote the welfare of the minor or incompetent person. A teacher may use reasonable physical force upon a student when and to the extent the teacher reasonably believes it necessary to maintain order in the school or classroom or at a school activity or event, whether or not it is held on school property.

      (2) An authorized official of a jail, prison or correctional facility may use physical force when and to the extent that the official reasonably believes it necessary to maintain order and discipline or as is authorized by law.

      (3) A person responsible for the maintenance of order in a common carrier of passengers, or a person acting under the direction of the person, may use physical force when and to the extent that the person reasonably believes it necessary to maintain order, but the person may use deadly physical force only when the person reasonably believes it necessary to prevent death or serious physical injury.

 

      (4) A person acting under a reasonable belief that another person is about to commit suicide or to inflict serious physical self-injury may use physical force upon that person to the extent that the person reasonably believes it necessary to thwart the result.

      (5) A person may use physical force upon another person in self-defense or in defending a third person, in defending property, in making an arrest or in preventing an escape, as hereafter prescribed in chapter 743, Oregon Laws 1971.

      Note 3: See second note under 161.015.

      161.209 Use of physical force in defense of a person. Except as provided in ORS 161.215 and 161.219, a person is justified in using physical force upon another person for self-defense or to defend a third person from what the person reasonably believes to be the use or imminent use of unlawful physical force, and the person may use a degree of force which the person reasonably believes to be necessary for the purpose. [1971 c.743 §22]

      161.210 [Repealed by 1971 c.743 §432]

      161.215 Limitations on use of physical force in defense of a person. Notwithstanding ORS 161.209, a person is not justified in using physical force upon another person if:

      (1) With intent to cause physical injury or death to another person, the person provokes the use of unlawful physical force by that person; or

      (2) The person is the initial aggressor, except that the use of physical force upon another person under such circumstances is justifiable if the person withdraws from the encounter and effectively communicates to the other person the intent to do so, but the latter nevertheless continues or threatens to continue the use of unlawful physical force; or

      (3) The physical force involved is the product of a combat by agreement not specifically authorized by law. [1971 c.743 §24]

      161.219 Limitations on use of deadly physical force in defense of a person. Notwithstanding the provisions of ORS 161.209, a person is not justified in using deadly physical force upon another person unless the person reasonably believes that the other person is:

      (1) Committing or attempting to commit a felony involving the use or threatened imminent use of physical force against a person; or

      (2) Committing or attempting to commit a burglary in a dwelling; or

      (3) Using or about to use unlawful deadly physical force against a person. [1971 c.743 §23]

      161.220 [Repealed by 1971 c.743 §432]

 

      161.225 Use of physical force in defense of premises. (1) A person in lawful possession or control of premises is justified in using physical force upon another person when and to the extent that the person reasonably believes it necessary to prevent or terminate what the person reasonably believes to be the commission or attempted commission of a criminal trespass by the other person in or upon the premises.

      (2) A person may use deadly physical force under the circumstances set forth in subsection (1) of this section only:

      (a) In defense of a person as provided in ORS 161.219; or

      (b) When the person reasonably believes it necessary to prevent the commission of arson or a felony by force and violence by the trespasser.

      (3) As used in subsection (1) and subsection (2)(a) of this section, “premises” includes any building as defined in ORS 164.205 and any real property. As used in subsection (2)(b) of this section, “premises” includes any building. [1971 c.743 §25]

      161.229 Use of physical force in defense of property. A person is justified in using physical force, other than deadly physical force, upon another person when and to the extent that the person reasonably believes it to be necessary to prevent or terminate the commission or attempted commission by the other person of theft or criminal mischief of property. [1971 c.743 §26]

      161.230 [Repealed by 1971 c.743 §432]

      161.235 Use of physical force in making an arrest or in preventing an escape. Except as provided in ORS 161.239, a peace officer is justified in using physical force upon another person only when and to the extent that the peace officer reasonably believes it necessary:

      (1) To make an arrest or to prevent the escape from custody of an arrested person unless the peace officer knows that the arrest is unlawful; or

      (2) For self-defense or to defend a third person from what the peace officer reasonably believes to be the use or imminent use of physical force while making or attempting to make an arrest or while preventing or attempting to prevent an escape. [1971 c.743 §27]

      161.239 Use of deadly physical force in making an arrest or in preventing an escape. (1) Notwithstanding the provisions of ORS 161.235, a peace officer may use deadly physical force only when the peace officer reasonably believes that:

      (a) The crime committed by the person was a felony or an attempt to commit a felony involving the use or threatened imminent use of physical force against a person; or

      (b) The crime committed by the person was kidnapping, arson, escape in the first degree, burglary in the first degree or any attempt to commit such a crime; or

      (c) Regardless of the particular offense which is the subject of the arrest or attempted escape, the use of deadly physical force is necessary to defend the peace officer or another person from the use or threatened imminent use of deadly physical force; or

      (d) The crime committed by the person was a felony or an attempt to commit a felony and under the totality of the circumstances existing at the time and place, the use of such force is necessary; or

      (e) The officer’s life or personal safety is endangered in the particular circumstances involved.

      (2) Nothing in subsection (1) of this section constitutes justification for reckless or criminally negligent conduct by a peace officer amounting to an offense against or with respect to innocent persons whom the peace officer is not seeking to arrest or retain in custody. [1971 c.743 §28]

      161.240 [Repealed by 1971 c.743 §432]

      161.245 “Reasonable belief” described; status of unlawful arrest. (1) For the purposes of ORS 161.235 and 161.239, a reasonable belief that a person has committed an offense means a reasonable belief in facts or circumstances which if true would in law constitute an offense. If the believed facts or circumstances would not in law constitute an offense, an erroneous though not unreasonable belief that the law is otherwise does not render justifiable the use of force to make an arrest or to prevent an escape from custody.

      (2) A peace officer who is making an arrest is justified in using the physical force prescribed in ORS 161.235 and 161.239 unless the arrest is unlawful and is known by the officer to be unlawful. [1971 c.743 §29]

      161.249 Use of physical force by private person assisting an arrest. (1) Except as provided in subsection (2) of this section, a person who has been directed by a peace officer to assist the peace officer to make an arrest or to prevent an escape from custody is justified in using physical force when and to the extent that the person reasonably believes that force to be necessary to carry out the peace officer’s direction.

      (2) A person who has been directed to assist a peace officer under circumstances specified in subsection (1) of this section may use deadly physical force to make an arrest or to prevent an escape only when:

      (a) The person reasonably believes that force to be necessary for self-defense or to defend a third person from what the person reasonably believes to be the use or imminent use of deadly physical force; or

      (b) The person is directed or authorized by the peace officer to use deadly physical force unless the person knows that the peace officer is not authorized to use deadly physical force under the circumstances. [1971 c.743 §30]

 161.250 [Repealed by 1971 c.743 §432]

      161.255 Use of physical force by private person making citizen’s arrest. (1) Except as provided in subsection (2) of this section, a private person acting on the person’s own account is justified in using physical force upon another person when and to the extent that the person reasonably believes it necessary to make an arrest or to prevent the escape from custody of an arrested person whom the person has arrested under ORS 133.225.

      (2) A private person acting under the circumstances prescribed in subsection (1) of this section is justified in using deadly physical force only when the person reasonably believes it necessary for self-defense or to defend a third person from what the person reasonably believes to be the use or imminent use of deadly physical force. [1971 c.743 §31; 1973 c.836 §339]

      161.260 Use of physical force in resisting arrest prohibited. A person may not use physical force to resist an arrest by a peace officer who is known or reasonably appears to be a peace officer, whether the arrest is lawful or unlawful. [1971 c.743 §32]

      161.265 Use of physical force to prevent escape. (1) A guard or other peace officer employed in a correctional facility, as that term is defined in ORS 162.135, is justified in using physical force, including deadly physical force, when and to the extent that the guard or peace officer reasonably believes it necessary to prevent the escape of a prisoner from a correctional facility.

      (2) Notwithstanding subsection (1) of this section, a guard or other peace officer employed by the Department of Corrections may not use deadly physical force in the circumstances described in ORS 161.267 (3). [1971 c.743 §33; 2005 c.431 §3]

      161.267 Use of physical force by corrections officer or official employed by Department of Corrections. (1) As used in this section:

      (a) “Colocated minimum security facility” means a Department of Corrections institution that has been designated by the Department of Corrections as a minimum security facility and has been located by the department on the grounds of a medium or higher security Department of Corrections institution.

      (b) “Department of Corrections institution” has the meaning given that term in ORS 421.005.

      (c) “Stand-alone minimum security facility” means a Department of Corrections institution that has been designated by the department as a minimum security facility and that has been located by the department separate and apart from other Department of Corrections institutions.

      (2) A corrections officer or other official employed by the Department of Corrections is justified in using physical force, including deadly physical force, when and to the extent that the officer or official reasonably believes it necessary to:

      (a) Prevent the escape of an inmate from a Department of Corrections institution, including the grounds of the institution, or from custody;

      (b) Maintain or restore order and discipline in a Department of Corrections institution, or any part of the institution, in the event of a riot, disturbance or other occurrence that threatens the safety of inmates, department employees or other persons; or

      (c) Prevent serious physical injury to or the death of the officer, official or another person.

      (3) Notwithstanding subsection (2)(a) of this section, a corrections officer or other official employed by the department may not use deadly physical force to prevent the escape of an inmate from:

      (a) A stand-alone minimum security facility;

      (b) A co-located minimum security facility, if the corrections officer or other official knows that the inmate has been classified by the department as minimum custody; or

      (c) Custody outside of a Department of Corrections institution:

      (A) While the inmate is assigned to an inmate work crew; or

      (B) During transport or other supervised activity, if the inmate is classified by the department as minimum custody and the inmate is not being transported or supervised with an inmate who has been classified by the department as medium or higher custody.

      (4) Nothing in this section limits the authority of a person to use physical force under ORS 161.205 (2) or 161.265. [2005 c.431 §2]

      161.270 Duress. (1) The commission of acts which would otherwise constitute an offense, other than murder, is not criminal if the actor engaged in the proscribed conduct because the actor was coerced to do so by the use or threatened use of unlawful physical force upon the actor or a third person, which force or threatened force was of such nature or degree to overcome earnest resistance.

      (2) Duress is not a defense for one who intentionally or recklessly places oneself in a situation in which it is probable that one will be subjected to duress.

      (3) It is not a defense that a spouse acted on the command of the other spouse, unless the spouse acted under such coercion as would establish a defense under subsection (1) of this section. [1971 c.743 §34; 1987 c.158 §22]

      161.275 Entrapment. (1) The commission of acts which would otherwise constitute an offense is not criminal if the actor engaged in the proscribed conduct because the actor was induced to do so by a law enforcement official, or by a person acting in cooperation with a law enforcement official, for the purpose of obtaining evidence to be used against the actor in a criminal prosecution.

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